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Writing Darkness

So the big thing this week is that I finished the second draft of the Creepy Play: my Southern (Ontario) Gothic family tragedy. And you guys, there was one night—I was expanding a scene between the mother and her adult daughter. Remember, this play is an angst-fest. The mother is a roiling, toxic pit of darkness, and her daughter’s an angry, hurt young woman who can be a) the most gentle, genuinely caring person in the play, or b)  casually crueller than anyone else.

The Creepy Play in a nutshell. I have looked for the artist, but cannot find a name. If you come across it, let me know!

Anyway, the scene was rolling along, but then I had to step back. I stumbled to my couch, squished in beside Guinness, and I cried.

Not because I’m a delicate flower. But because I understood the mother’s darkness. I understood her daughter’s anger. I saw what made these broken, anguished people the way they are.

“Autumn Evening,” Eilif Peterssen (1878)

And of course, it isn’t real. No more than a dream is. But it is distressing nonetheless, and so I wanted to talk about self-care when writing difficult scenes.

Except that a listicle feels trite. “Have a hot shower!” “Listen to comforting music!” “Read fluff!” Hopefully, you already know that.

(For the record: I listened to a lot of Anglican/Gregorian chant while writing the Creepy Play—I needed the familiar tone and repetitive tunes to stay grounded.)

So.

Sometimes, we have to look into the darkness. I’m not only talking about creative-types, here. Sometimes, we all have to do it. We need to shine a light into the furthest corners of our heads—and not look away. It’s hard.  No one likes seeing the darkness smile back when they look in the mirror.

“If all that’s inside me…what does that say about me?”

It says that humans are complex creatures, and we are all a mix of wonderful, noble, loving tendencies and awful, cruel, damaging ones. The best way to grapple with the darkness, I think, is to understand it. Not glorifying it; not revelling in it – but understanding.

And to do that, we need to enter it. Safely, carefully—this is where the hot showers and comforting music come in.

It’s really hard.

So what do we gain, doing it?

Connection, I think. Empathy. The ability to look at that hurt, angry young woman and say, “Yes, I can feel that too.”After all, the darkness is always worse when you don’t know what’s in it.

The trick is remembering to keep hold of the light. This has been a deeply uncomfortable play to write, and there will be another draft—but I know I’m better for having written it. I hope it serves its eventual audience, too.

Onwards…

-KT

What I’m Listening to This Week

For ages, I’ve been noodling the idea of borrowing polyphonic principles for my fiction. The climax of the Creepy Play is basically written that way: voices in counterpoint with each other, passing the melody back and forth, emphasizing certain phrases and motifs against each other…

Vivaldi isn’t precisely polyphony, but this section from his Gloria is what I was thinking of. Listen to the parts enter one by one, different ideas emerging to prominence and then sinking again (especially the tenors around 0:50, mirrored by the altos while the basses take the melody back). It’s a single whole—that interplay fascinates me.

 

 

Writing “The Snow Queen” in a Day

A while back, a friend sent me a link to this post: a ridiculous and then all-too-real look at a day in the writer’s life. I laughed, because it was true. Then I laughed, because if I didn’t, I might cry. And I thought – what does my day look like?

Around the same time, I realized I’d be adapting Hans Christian Anderson’s The Snow Queen into a 15-minute Christmas Pantomime in a very short, concentrated burst. “What better day to examine?” quoth I. “I shall document writing this script!”

And so I did. Here is an admittedly-not-wholly-typical day for me: in which I wrote The Snow Queen in a day.

9:22 am. Awaken, as Guinness has decided that enough is enough and he would really like breakfast. Since I was only up until 1 am or so, I feel slightly groggy, but mostly rested.

How do you say "No" to that face?

How do you say “No” to that face?

 

10:16 am. After coffee, Cheerios, shower, and dealing with cat, I am ready to start researching The Snow Queen. First up, an English translation of Hans Christian Anderson’s original, downloaded to Kindle.

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10:37 am. Realize that when Blythe gave me a synopsis of the story on the bus, she neglected to mention the Crow that randomly sends Gerda on a wild goose chase. At the end of the story, he’s DEAD. And no one cares all that much. WTF kind of story is this?!

His tame sweetheart is a widow, and wears a bit of black worsted round her leg; she laments most piteously, but it’s all mere talk and stuff!

 

10:55 am. Read another translation, just to make sure the nuances are consistent. Crow still snuffs it.

 

11:16 am. Turn my attention to the Shelley Duvall “Faerie Tale Theatre” adaptation. It is eighties-tastic.

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11:46 am. Knowing that Blythe grew up with this series explains a few things about her.

 

11:58 am. I would make a GREAT Robber Girl. Don’t tell me otherwise.

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12:03 pm. Well, that’s creepy as f***.

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12:27 pm. Lunch of grilled cheese and corn chips, because I’m seven.

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1:21 pm. Back to it with another eighties-tastic adaptation…

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Ripley!

 

1:36 pm. Sigourney Weaver does ALL the voices in this. The characters’ lips don’t even move. It’s like an audiobook with accompanying pictures. I guess that’s ONE way to cut costs. That said, she has a very versatile voice. Start pondering what audio roles I would write for her.

 

2:02 pm. Pull out whiteboard. Assemble a skeletal plot. Tally up characters. Request final instructions from project lead before writing starts.

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2:16 pm. Attend to dayjob costumes, because EVERYTHING is getting washed this weekend.

I'm told the appearance of Victorian garments in our laundry room makes me a cool housemate.

I’m told the appearance of Victorian garments in our laundry room makes me a cool housemate.

 

3:52 pm. Still waiting. Gripped by sudden anxiety regarding garret’s cleanliness (or lack thereof). Clean furiously. Admire new Pine-Sol floor cleaner. I can indeed both see AND smell a difference!

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5:27 pm. Writing will begin post-dinner: pasta, rapini, tomatoes, and mussels. I like these sorts of meals because it looks like something an adult might eat, but takes like, 15 minutes to make.

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6:02 pm. Sit at desk. How the f*** long is this meant to be, anyway? How long was the other pantomime I wrote?

 

6:16 pm. Frolic about on Twitter.

 

6:31 pm. OKAY WE’RE STARTING NOW.

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6:35 pm. Stare at screen. Realize I have no idea how to start. And I only have ten pages, tops. Softly mutter, “Tabarnac.”

 

6:36 pm. Frolic about on Twitter.

 

7:01 pm. It’s okay, it’s okay, we can do this. Make it through an excruciating first page. Then I find my rhythm. Writing feels a bit like building a house of cards: it’s taking shape, you’ve got the groove, it’s great – and it also feels like it’s a breath away from collapsing around your ears.

 

7:22 pm. Can I make a reference to every song on the Frozen soundtrack? Only one way to find out.

 

8:46 pm. Audio break, because I realize I forgot to send Lauren our Words of a Feather audio.

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Episode Two – coming soon!

 

9:11 pm. Back to the script. It’s either fine or dreadful. I’m not sure which, but we’ll keep going.

 

10:07 pm. AHAHAHA I HAVE FINISHED. ALL SHALL LOVE ME AND DESPAIR.

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“The ending should be really sweet, you know?” I WILL MAKE IT HAPPEN.

 

10:08 pm. Text Blythe.

 

10:19 pm. Internet woes. Call Bell and express my displeasure again. While waiting, quickly scan script and fix most egregiously bad prose. Decide that it’s pretty good for a first bash-through.

 

10:54 pm. Finally manage to send script off.

 

11:16 pm. “Katie this is fabulous!”

 

11:17 pm. Accept praise. Mentally start making edits. (Gerda should possibly not say, “Really?” three times in a row.)

 

11:30 pm. Frolic about on Twitter.

 

11:47 pm. Sleep.

 

And that’s how I wrote a treatment of The Snow Queen in a day. Again, my writing days don’t always look like this. Perhaps in the off-season, we’ll try this again… 😉

-KT

What I’m Listening To This Week

This piece floated through my head this week – appropriate enough for Remembrance Day on Friday, I suppose. It’s a lovely choral setting of Christina Rossetti’s poem, “Remember.” Pieces like this really should be treated like monologues: there’s a dramatic arc, intention, a goal and change. This choir gets that across pretty well – particularly in the rising urgency around 1:25.